Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Today We Are a CD!

Hey, I know it's an obsolete format, but the disc version of the reissue of my 90's band's album masterpiece (superbly re-mastered and with bonus tracks) is now available for purchase.


It's been downloadable since last December (iTunes, Amazon, and the rest of the usual suspects including Spotify, whatever that is) but the actual CDs are finally at our distributor; you can order the physical copies at CD Baby over HERE.

And because I love you all more than food, here's what was the concluding track on the original 1995 version. I think it's freaking killer, but obviously I'm prejudiced.



In any case, if you decide to order the thing, remember -- as they used to say at MAD magazine: "$12.97. Cheap."

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Closed for Monkey Business


All tuckered out, and I don't mean Carlson.

Regular totally dressed and peppy postings -- including some delightful news involving the music of a band whose bass player's name rhymes with Sleeve Nimels -- resume on the morrow.

Monday, April 24, 2017

In Search of Caitie Riff

Long-time readers of this here blog may recall that back in February of last year I completely went out of my nut over Debutante, the astoundingly assured (self-released) debut album by singer/songwriter/force of nature Cait Brennan.

And now comes her non-slump sophomore effort Third -- via the fine folks at Omnivore Records (where she belongs) -- which is, cheekily, named after a certain album by a certain Memphis band you may have heard of.

And which (much like Debutante was for me in 2016) is already my 2017 album of the year even though it's not even summer yet.


If you haven't yet heard Cait, Melissa Bratcher of Popshift reviewed Debutante and nailed it:

"Cait Brennan has an instantly recognizable voice, and, paired with her sugary power pop proclivities, makes the kind of music that stops me in my tracks. With an undeniable gift for writing hooky delights, she’s an heir to the throne of the greats: ELO, Nilsson, The Sweet, Rundgren. Her influences are all over her songs and Debutante is a sparkly kaleidoscope of AM Radio, 1970s pop, and confessional lyrics. It’s delightful.

I couldn't agree more, although at the time I added Big Star (little did I know) and Glam Era Mott the Hoople and David Bowie to the list of reference points; listening to the new record -- which in a lot of ways is considerably darker in tone -- I also hear flashes of Prince and early 70s pre-disco r&b and soul as well.

In any event, those previously mentioned long-time readers may also recall I have already gone on record as saying that "Bad at Apologies" -- the lead off track from Third -- has one of the greatest opening lines in rock history. Which is certainly true, and if there's any justice in this world, the song's choruses will also be sung by a stadium audience near you sometime very soon.



But (mirabile dictu) the rest of the album (recorded at the same Ardent studio as Big Star's masterpieces) is a real advance over Debutante; musically and lyrically richer in just about every way. It may not be an exaggeration to say that Cait and co-producer/multi-instrumentalist Fernando Perdomo could be the most synergistically-matched team of artistic collaborators since those four kids from Liverpool hooked up with that older guy at EMI who had recorded The Goons.

I'm particularly enamored of "Goodbye Missamerica," which -- over the sounds of Alex Chilton's very own mellotron -- speaks rather poignantly in part to the current state of the US of A and Cait's personal backstory; "Benedict Cumberbatch," a big sort of Queen-inspired power ballad in which Cait tells a faithless lover that she's giving the song to the Dr. Strange/Sherlock star instead; and "Caitiebots Don't Cry," which is such an astoundingly smart piece of self-referential post-modern pop that you don't know whether to laugh out loud or go "I'm not worthy" or both. But there's not a song on the record that doesn't repay the time spent in listening. And hardly one that doesn't make you want to get up and dance around your house -- as John Lennon put it -- in wild abdomen.

Have I mentioned that Cait's vocals throughout are beyond amazing?

That duty pleasantly dispatched, I will end by pointing out that you can learn more about Cait and Third over at her official website HERE. You can also purchase said fine audio product over at Amazon HERE and what are you waiting for?

Friday, April 21, 2017

Your Friday Moment of Four Strings Good!

From 2016, please enjoy The Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra and their quite remarkable cover of Thin Lizzy's classic "The Boys Are Back in Town."



I think at this point we can all agree that you can get an impressive amount of music out of those tiny things; that said, I really would like an explanation for the resurgence of interest in an instrument that -- for most of my lifetime, anyway -- had been mostly associated with the era of bathtub gin and flappers.

Have a great weekend, everybody. Especially (and this is a clue to Monday's post) you, Cait!

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Your Thursday Moment of Well, This is Kinda Interesting

From 2012 please enjoy Hospitality and their sort of breathless alt-rock take on the Steely Dan classic "Rikki Don't Lose That Number."



Chanced upon this one yesterday when I posted the GWAR clip from the A.V. Club. Not particularly sure I'd want to hear any of this bunch's originals, but there's something about this one that got under my skin. It helps that the original song is pretty much a masterpiece, of course.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Your Wednesday Moment of Words Fail Me

Frpm 2012, please enjoy the irrepressible GWAR doing to "Carry On My Wayward Son" what, frankly, should have been done to the entire Kansas catalogue years ago.



Have I mentioned that words fail me?

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Closed for Monkey Business


A tad under the weather, actually.

Regular tanned, rested and ready postings -- including (on Friday) a review of the album of the year even though it's only April -- resume on the morrow.

Monday, April 17, 2017

Be a Patron of the Arts -- It's Fun!

Holy cow -- power pop genius and friend of this here blog Richard X. Heyman has a new CD coming out! And he needs your help!!!



If you don't know Richard's work -- either solo (or more recently with his ace band The Doughboys) -- here's an excerpt from the very first thing I wrote about him back in 2007, when both this blog and the world were young.

RICHARD X. HEYMAN: Actual Sighs
(TurnUp Records )


Let's start this with a mea culpa and an embarassing confession.

First of all, there's no question in my mind that this album would have made my Top Ten list in the 2006 Village Voice critic's poll save for the inconvenient fact that I didn't hear it until last week. Sorry. What's worse, I'm afraid, is that even though its auteur has been a wildly acclaimed power pop icon for two decades I'd never actually heard a note of his until then. Ridiculous, really, when you consider that my long-time critical colleague Parke Puterbaugh (who contributes excellent liner notes to the album) wrote not one but two rave reviews of earlier Heyman CDs when I was his editor at Sound and Vision (i.e., The Magazine Formerly Known as Stereo Review).

Oy, as they say, gevalt.

But let's move on. For those who've been as out of touch as yours truly, here's what you need to know. Richard X. Heyman is a singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (one of the best, actually -- he's a killer drummer, unlike most of the breed) who's been making wonderful classicist pop rock (occasionally on major labels) since 1986. The album currently under discussion is in some sense a remake. What happened was that back then Heyman had twenty songs ready to unleash on the waiting world, but after recording six of them he couldn't afford any more studio time and decided to release what he'd finished as a mini-album (or EP, as they used to be called). On "Actual Sighs," ("Actual Size" back in the day) he's re-recorded the original six and finally gotten around to the orphans. As Puterbaugh points out, there's really nothing to compare to it in pop history except for Brian Wilson's revisiting of the Beach Boys' "Smile," except that (for me, anyway) "Actual Sighs" is more consistently terrific...
You can read the rest of the review over HERE. And because I love you all more than food, here's my favorite track from the record -- the spine-tinglingly gorgeous closer "The Gazing Moon."



Meanwhile, here's the KICKSTARTER LINK for the new record.

What are you waiting for, you bastids -- get over there and show the guy some love.

And when you do, tell 'em PowerPop sent you.

Friday, April 14, 2017

"Let's Let the Little Twerp Express Himself as Best as He Can"

For those of you who don't recognize the title quote, that's one of the many funny but mean things Sir Raymond Douglas Davies used to say on stage about his younger brother Dave Davies' solo turns..

I bring it up because I got to see Dave sans the other Kinks for the very first time this past Wednesday (here I am with World's Greatest Kinks Fan Frank Lima and the incomparable Dennis Diken of The Smithereens, who was the drummer on the gig)...


...and -- be still my beating heart -- Dave opened with this fabulous 1968 gem by his celebrated sibling.



I'd actually forgotten that song (which originally appeared as the B-side of "Days") until the other night, and boy does it kick all sorts of ass.

As for the show itself, it was mostly a lot of fun, although I'd be lying if I said I wasn't disappointed that Dave was performing as a power trio (not to cast aspersions on his guitar stylings, which were splendid throughout the evening; I just would have preferred a crunchy rhythm guitar to flesh out the sound).

That said, to my regret, Dave omitted my all-time favorite song from his catalog -- one I wrote about about on this here blog back in 2009, and which I will repost now for obvious reasons.

From 1965 (and the only-in-America compilation album Kinkdom), please enjoy The Kinks, featuring Dave Davies on lead vocals, and the oh-so-sad-and-beautiful folk-rock ballad "Wait Till the Summer Comes Along."




I've adored that song (Dave's first writers credit on a Kinks record, if memory serves) since buying the LP above in a crappy reprocessed stereo version at Sam Goody in Paramus, New Jersey. But I hadn't listened to it in a while, and on revisiting it (and still finding it deeply touching, I hasten to add) I was immediately struck by a) how slapdash the Shel Talmy production is and b) what a wonderfully pretentious Sorrows of Young Werther kid's blues it is.

"I've been crying all the winter," Dave all but sobs in the song's opening line, and the clear implication is that his life has been nothing but endless heartache, self-lacerating guilt and tragedy, and frankly what's the point of going on?

Just to put things in perspective, its popstar composer was all of 17 when he wrote and recorded it.

Have great weekend, everybody!

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Closed for Monkey Business: Special Rock 'n' Roll Animal Edition


Got back late from seeing Dave Davies at the City Winery last night.

Regular posting -- including my thoughts on the show -- resume on the morrow.