Monday, April 09, 2012

Mr. President, I'm Beginning to Smell a Big, Fat Commie Rat!!!

Okay, I wouldn't have believed this one if I hadn't heard it myself. Or even then, actually.

From WeWillBuryYou.Com:
Here is the rarest 45's release from special vaults!

Who can believe that unknown musicians from Soviet Union, behind the "iron curtain" -- Vladimir Zuev & The Four Beatmen -- back in 1966 (!!!) released on label Fontana this unique for its time recording!

Probably this single did not make a breakthrough in the charts at that time only because it remained in the promo version, and almost all pressed copies were destroyed...

Why? Who knows! In those old days the music is often interfered with politics - this may be the cause...

Now it is the rarest collector's release with a price in e-Bay auction slot above 7000$.

About this group and artist of almost nothing is known except that they lived and performed in Moscow in the mid-Sixties, and this rare recording was made on a radio-studio...
Obviously, the author of the above was not entirely comfortable with English, but in any case please enjoy the aforementioned Vladimir Zuev and The Four Beatmen with their remarkably Slavic cover of "Fujiyama Mama," the double entendre rockabilly classic best known from the 1956 version by Wanda Jackson.





Truly -- music IS the universal language.

8 comments:

buzzbabyjesus said...

There is just no way that recording was made in a Moscow radio station studio in 1966. Of course it's a hoax. As usual I only got to 1:01 before I'd heard enough. And you're over a week late for April Fool's.

steve simels said...

You have to admit -- somebody went through an awful lot of trouble to photoshop that authentic looking Fontana label.
:-)

edward said...

So, what's o the B-side? ;>

TMink said...

Dire Straights at 4 AM.

On a bad night.

Trey

FD13NYC said...

I got to 1:15 before I said nyet. Unusual find, from wherever it is. The music is ok, but the vocals are horrible but amusing. I think I'll stick with the Wanda Jackson version.

Peter said...

"Vladimir Zuev" is how I imagine George Carlin's singing voice. If someone told me that George Carlin was the vocalist, I'd completely believe them.

As for the record's non-1966-ness, the sound of the bass guitar is a bit of a giveaway, as well as the drum fills at the end of the track. Not very 1966 at all.

By the way, I went looking for more information about the elusive Mr. Zuev and found out that there are quite a few actual ones. There's an artist, an ice skater, a poet...

steve simels said...



Bye the way, I went looking for more information about the elusive Mr. Zuev and found out that there are quite a few actual ones. There's an artist, an ice skater, a poet...


I wouldn't be at all surprised.
:-)

Roadmaster said...

Sounds like a track that a mediocre 1990s blues band would throw into a set for comic relief.

The purloined "Revolution" riff was a 0.47 second telltale "BS" on the "1966" faux backstory.

I will give cred to the graphics person for the above-average job on the Fontana Euro-45. I've seen plenty of bootlegs with less-convincing typography.